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Posts for: June, 2020

ExcitingNewDiscoveryCouldHelpintheFightAgainstAntibioticResistance

Like the rest of healthcare, antibiotics have transformed dentistry. Advanced oral infections that once eluded successful treatment are routinely stopped with the use of these “wonder drugs.” But their overuse over the years has given rise to dangerous “superbugs” resistant to many antibiotics.

Antibiotics are one of the 20th Century's most significant healthcare achievements. Drugs like penicillin played a major role ending the global threat of tuberculosis, cholera and bacterial meningitis. Over the last few decades, more antibiotics have been developed to defend against an even wider array of bacterial dangers.

But along the way doctors and dentists began prescribing antibiotics for all manner of illnesses including viral infections like colds or flu for which they're less effective. They've also been increasingly used as a preventive measure, including inclusion in animal feed to fight disease.

But our tiny biological nemeses are adaptable. As bacterial strains come in contact with greater amounts of antibiotics, individual bacterium that survive transmit their resistance to subsequent generations. This can produce new strains like Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that are resistant to methicillin and other common antibiotics that once contained them.

There's deep concern that these new resistant strains, often recent incarnations of old diseases once thought defeated, will lead to higher rates of sickness and death. Increasing resistance could also make common procedures like those performed by dentists and oral surgeons, much riskier to undertake.

To combat this, pharmaceutical companies are racing to create new drugs to compensate. Recently, they've received an encouraging sign of hope in this battle from an unlikely source: viruses. Researchers in Tel Aviv, Israel have discovered an antagonistic protein to bacteria among a group of viruses called bacteriophages. The protein, injected into a bacterium, commandeers the cell's DNA function to aid virus reproduction, which kills the host.

In the words of one researcher, this makes these particular “enemy of our enemy” viruses our “friend.” Although the discovery is still a long way from practical use in antibiotics, harnessing it in future drug versions could help pack a greater punch against resistant bacteria.

In the meantime, providers and patients alike must practice and advocate for stricter protocols regarding the use of antibiotics. The viability of tomorrow's healthcare is on the line.

If you would like more information on the use of antibiotics in dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


3ReasonsaRootCanalTreatmentMightFailandWhatYouCanDoAboutIt

It's not an exaggeration to say the modern root canal treatment has saved millions of teeth over the last century. Without this procedure, there's not a lot we can do to stop advanced tooth decay from infecting and destroying a tooth.

What's more, a root canal treatment could extend the life of a tooth for decades. Notice we said could—although most root canals do have satisfactory outcomes, there's still a chance a tooth may become re-infected. Here are 3 possible causes for an unsuccessful root canal treatment, and what you can do to lessen their impact.

The severity of the infection. Tooth decay usually begins at the enamel layer, softened by the acid produced by bacteria. Untreated, the infection can then spread through the next tooth layer of dentin until finally infecting the innermost pulp. From there the infection can move through the root canals to the bone, dramatically increasing the danger to the tooth. Root canal treatments have a higher chance of success the earlier they're performed in the disease progression, so see your dentist at the first sign of pain or other tooth abnormality.

The root canal network. An effective root canal procedure eliminates all dead or diseased tissue in both the pulp chamber and the root canals (these are then filled to prevent future infection). But this may prove difficult with teeth that have intricate root canal networks because of a higher risk of overlooking some of the canals. It may be best in such cases for an endodontist, a specialist in treating interior tooth issues, to perform the procedure using their advanced techniques and microscopic equipment.

The age of the tooth. Root canal treatment can weaken a tooth's structural integrity, especially with older teeth. This can make them more susceptible to fracture and a higher chance of infection. We can avoid this outcome by placing crowns on root-canaled teeth: The crown provides structural strength to the tooth and can add further protection against infection. Older teeth may also benefit from the placement of a small support post within it to further add stability before applying the crown.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: How Long Will It last?


By DeMarco Family Dental
June 01, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental anxiety  
3WaystoTaketheJittersOutofDentalVisits

Dental anxiety is a common problem: it’s estimated that one in two Americans admits to some level of nervousness about seeing the dentist. On the extreme side of this statistic about 15% of the population even avoid or postpone dental care because of it. While comedy shows routinely make fun of people’s fear of the dentist, the consequences of not receiving needed dental care due to dental anxiety are no laughing matter.

Fortunately, visiting the dentist doesn’t have to be a nerve-wracking, butterflies-in-the-stomach experience. Here are 3 ways to make sure your next visit is more pleasant.

The right dentist. Dental care is more than technical—it’s also personal and relational. The most important element for reducing dental visit anxiety is a provider you’re comfortable with and that you trust. It’s especially important for high anxiety patients to find a dentist who also has compassion for how they feel and won’t judge them—instead, working with them to find just the right combination of techniques and possible medications that encourage relaxation.

Oral sedation. For many people nervous about dental visits the answer could be prescribed sedation medication taken an hour or so before their appointment. Typically a mild sedative, the dose is just enough to help them relax. It’s also often coupled with other methods like nitrous oxide or local anesthesia for a pain-free and unstressed experience.

IV sedation. For people with high levels of anxiety, it’s often beneficial to increase the level of sedation. One of the best ways to do this is with an intravenous flow of medication that will place a person in a deeper state of relaxation. Although this method requires careful vital sign monitoring during the procedure, it’s often the best way to calm patients with high anxiety so they can receive the dental care they need.

Working with your dentist, you can develop just the right mix of these and other methods for making your dental visits easier. No matter what your level of anxiety, you don’t have to avoid the dentist nor needed dental care.

If you would like more information on reducing anxiety during dental visits, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “IV Sedation in Dentistry.”